Josué Marchi, Argentinian Blues

Picture provided by my guest

I met Josue Marchi thru my good friend Javier López Trezza (he was my guest on this episode). Javier indeed knows many people and always bring good vibes to a good conversation.

On this episode (check it here), was not different. Josué is a blues guitar player and singer with a great sense of humor, a great beat, and, most of all, a great riff in his blues.  Like all my episodes, we talked about his childhood and blues heroes and how he immersed on the Mississippi blues.

As a guitar aficionado and passionate of listening to its different sounds, we shared our experiences with different guitars, how we approach each one of them, and much more. Josué shared a story about an Italian uncle he had and his hollow body electric guitar built by a Italian Luthier.

Josue’s Italian guitar
This is my hollow body guitar

Here is a picture of his uncle’s guitar. Josué shared with me a picture of his uncle.

This episode is full of music rock arias (I am taking borrowed a classical music term). Plus, I might say, full of reverbs by the stories we share and of our idols.

As Josué admitted, blues is a genre that seems to have an exclusive niche among our generation, musicians, and followers close to our age (over fifties). No younger generation in Argentina, and maybe elsewhere, is taking part of this wonderful genre and a wild ride on it. Perhaps, consumerism has triumphed over what is supposed to be a better quality sound and music lyrics. Time will tell.

What we are sure, is that we are living in a fast lane. Big corporations are seeking easy and fast money. Henceforth, selling “famous” trendy people as a branding. This the problem in music business, everything is a brand, a person is not human anymore. We see it on famous commercial logos. People, as a branding, are hot items to sell and buy. Remember the newly launched sneakers of a famous basketball player?

Digital platforms are killing what is left of music industry, and record label companies are assisting on its demise, if not taking the charge on it. All independent musicians, such as Josué, needs of a life jacket to survive this pandemic ordeal and this sort of takeover by this corporate suits. Our governments are not doing anything on their behalf and not planning to do anything on the future. They are left by themselves to survive, which is a shame and a pity.

I suggest that you visit Josué music archives, as well as your favorite indie band or musician, on any digital platforms or crowd funding pages to help them with the downloads. Remember that every time a song is downloaded, the chances of getting paid, even a ridicule sum of money paid by Spotify, might be a breath of hope for musicians like him.

As a closing to this post, I am hoping that our conversation held outside of this episode comes to fruition and bring an episode on a topic that I am very passionate and that I started digging some information worth of sharing.

Let me know what you think of this episode on the comment box below this note and of any other episode that you have listened so far.

Thank you for stopping by and taking your time to read this post and listening to my conversation with Josue Marchi.

See you in the next post…

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